Web Content and Information Architecture

Web Content and Information Architecture

One of the things we talk about a lot with our clients is User Experience.  It’s a critical part of any web design project we undertake.

User experience essentially revolves around how people use your website, how they feel when doing so and perhaps most importantly, how easy it is for them to leave. 

We’re not saying you should base your user experience thinking around holding people hostage on your website, but one critical element that often gets overlooked is content.

Content is a huge part of how users interact with a website.  Its a vital component of your website design to get right. 

You’ll notice on a lot of websites you visit, a link to a page labelled FAQ’s (Frequently Asked Questions).  Obviously the necessity for an FAQ page depends on the nature of your business and how intrinsic your product base or service is, but should you even need such a page on your site?

“What’s wrong with answering customer queries?” is a question that may have just rolled around your head while reading that last paragraph.  In short, nothing.  However, a well designed website with well thought out and structured content shouldn’t need a page populated with questions and answers to provide your customers with that knowledge.

When conducting a strategy session with a client, one of the things that takes the most time is thinking about how and where we place content on a website.  We tend to focus on the organisation, structure and titles of content in a way that makes it easy for website visitors to digest information and answer any questions they may have.

Its become such an important factor to the way we approach a project that is can often, and should dictate a website design.  Its worth taking the time and effort to think about how your website can be designed in such a way that it presents the information your customers will need as quickly and as efficiently as possible.

In other words, ensure that your online presence focuses on user requirements rather than branding or what you might think looks nice in a certain area of your homepage.  If the journey you want your website visitor to take is to get them to call you, display your contact details as clearly and as prominently as possible.

Think about a user’s journey from the moment they land on your homepage right through to the last action you want them to ideally take – whether that be calling you or making a purchase through your site.  How can they get from homepage to checkout as easily as possible?  Again, remember to think about your customer and the problems they may be facing rather than what you think is the best thing to do.

Don’t use a FAQ page to tell your brand’s story, make that your website’s job!

If you’d like to know more about website content and user experience, get in touch with us today to discuss how we can help with one of our strategy sessions!